FAQ

What are the most common causes of hip pain?

How can I tell if my hip pain is serious?

What are the treatment options for hip pain?

How can I find the best hip specialist in New York?

Can hip pain be prevented?

How long is the recovery after hip surgery?

How are hip problems diagnosed?

How is hip arthritis treated?

What is avascular necrosis?

What is hip bursitis?

What is a hip pointer?

What is hip dysplasia?

What are the most common causes of hip pain?

Hip pain can stem from various sources, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, bursitis, tendinitis, labral tears, hip fractures, and sports injuries. Factors such as aging, overuse, trauma, and underlying health conditions contribute to these issues.

How can I tell if my hip pain is serious?

If hip pain persists despite rest and over-the-counter medications, or if it’s accompanied by severe symptoms like intense pain, swelling, or difficulty moving the hip joint, it’s important to consult a hip specialist. Sudden, sharp pain, especially after a fall or injury, also warrants immediate medical attention.

What are the treatment options for hip pain?

Treatment varies based on the cause and severity of the pain. Options range from conservative methods like physical therapy, medications, and lifestyle modifications to more invasive procedures such as hip arthroscopy, osteoplasty, total hip replacement, and hip resurfacing.

How can I find the best hip specialist in New York?

When selecting a hip specialist, it’s crucial to consider their qualifications, experience, and approach to patient care. At New York Sports & Joints, our specialists are distinguished by their education from top universities like Princeton, Stanford, Harvard, Cornell, and Columbia. Each surgeon is board-certified, fellowship-trained, and proficient in the latest surgical techniques, ensuring high-quality care. Our team’s expertise covers a range of conditions, from sports medicine to complex joint replacements. We offer services in both Spanish and English.

Can hip pain be prevented?

While not all hip pain is preventable, maintaining a healthy weight, staying active with low-impact exercises, practicing good posture, and avoiding repetitive stress can help reduce the risk. For athletes, proper training and using appropriate equipment are essential preventive measures.

How long is the recovery after hip surgery?

Recovery time depends on the type of surgery and the individual’s overall health. Minimally invasive surgeries like arthroscopy may have a shorter recovery time, while total hip replacement might require several weeks to months of rehabilitation. Following a surgeon’s post-operative care plan is crucial for a successful recovery.

How are hip problems diagnosed?

  • Physical examination
  • X-Ray
  • MRI or CT Scan

How is hip arthritis treated?

The most common type of arthritis of the hip is osteoarthritis. In this disease, the cartilage in the hip, especially the acetabular labrum, gradually wears away with use and time. Treatments for osteoarthritis include:

  • Medication to reduce pain, such as aspirin and acetaminophen
  • Medication to reduce swelling and inflammation, such as ibuprofen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
  • Exercises to improve flexibility and strength
  • Maintaining a healthy body weight

Rheumatoid arthritis is another type of arthritis that affects the hip. In rheumatoid arthritis, the hip becomes inflamed, and cartilage may be destroyed. The treatment includes:

  • Physical therapy
  • Medications
  • Hip replacement surgery

What is avascular necrosis?

Avascular Necrosis (AVN) is a disease resulting from the temporary or permanent loss of blood flow to the bone. This can lead to the destruction of the bone and a severe reduction in functionality of the joint. AVN is especially common in the hip and can be treated several ways:

  • Total hip replacement
  • Metal on-metal resurfacing
  • Core decompression
  • Free vascular fibular graft

What is hip bursitis?

Bursitis is the painful swelling of the bursae, fluid-filled sacs on the cushion areas where tendons and muscles slide across bone. Specific to the hip is trochanteric bursitis (also known as greater trochanteric pain syndrome or GTPS), which refers to the bursa by the head of the femur. This shock-absorbing sac can become agitated and swollen for unknown reasons or as a symptom of other issues such as gluteal tendon infections, uneven leg length, or Iliotibial Band Syndrome. Some actions help to prevent bursitis by strengthening the core and hips through a moderate training program. Orthotic inserts for people with flat feet can also help. The condition can be treated by:

  • Rest
  • NSAIDs or steroids to reduce swelling
  • Physical therapy
  • Surgical removal of the bursa (bursectomy)

What is a hip pointer?

A hip pointer is a bruise on the iliac crest of the hip bone, usually caused by a strong physical blow, such as that in full-contact sports. It can cause bleeding of the hip abductor muscles, making leg movement painful. Our physician can take X-rays to see if there has been permanent damage to the iliac crest, but the issue generally resolves itself within four to six weeks.

What is hip dysplasia?

Hip dysplasia is a misalignment of the hip joint that can either be congenital (present at birth) or acquired, but both are considered multi-factorial, meaning there must be more than just either of these two factors at work to cause the disorder. The congenital form has been linked to chromosome 13 and, much more rarely, chromosome 4.

This condition can be acquired if an infant is swaddled too tightly, and their hips get locked for long periods of time. Hip dysplasia can be detected early on through ultrasound as well as through X-ray once the baby has been born. It is most often treated using a Pavlik harness to reassert the correct alignment of the bones, although it is also possible the child will grow out of the misalignment. In severe cases, surgery to repair or replace the hip joint will be needed.

Schedule Your Appointment Have Confidence in Your Future

Contact Us
Contact us media
Accessibility: If you are vision-impaired or have some other impairment covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act or a similar law, and you wish to discuss potential accommodations related to using this website, please contact our Accessibility Manager at (212) 355-5555.
Contact Us